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Chat pop-ups for "John" didn't start as immediately as for "Michael", but once they did (after about a day), they were similarly incessant, and equally implausible.

of asiandating.com, which might or might not suffer similar problems - I haven't checked it out.Recently, due to a friend's involvement, I had cause to investigate the authenticity of an Asian dating site.To check that this wasn't some strange anomaly, on 5 July 2014 I created another fake account, "John Smith", aged 88 (the maximum age it is possible to set for men on asiandate.com), with profile description ("A Few Words About Yourself") set to "I am an old and decrepit man with terminal cancer and absolutely no money. As with "Michael"'s account, I provided no photographs.Within two days, the account received 15 letters, with similar results as for "Michael" - many of the writers claimed to have read, and to be attracted to "John" based on, his profile; many of them provided more than one photograph.Here is a sample of those quotes from those letters, including any of my comments in grey.

Out of the first 23 letters that I opened, 13 (about 57%) of them, as quoted above, explicitly asserted that the writer had read "Michael's" profile and was interested in him based upon that profile, and three others (about 13%) implied it by writing such things as "I’m very interested in you [...] I believe the first sight , perhaps the first look can doom our fate", "you can't imagine how happy I am at the moment" and "I feel so happy to be here to coonect with you my dear".

Otherwise, read on for the build-up to that evidence. They never stopped, only increasing in frequency over the following few days.

The vast majority of the "women" (I quote that word only because it is entirely possible that behind any of these messages was a man) messaging "Michael" sported profile pictures that looked professionally photographed, and most of the ladies could even have passed for professional models - in all likelihood, many if not most of these images were of professional models.

It is even strongly suggestive of systemic scamming - that these letters are sent out by the system itself rather than by personal agents.

Today (14 July 2014), I came upon the smoking gun that all but proves that this is the case: the second line of a letter from "Shanshan(Joan)" contained a typo which reveals that, apparently, variables such as can be set in these letters, strong evidence that these letters are actually generated by a script which replaces variables with values and then automatically sends the letters out.

A sample of some of the first few messages "Michael" received, along with my commentary, if any, in grey, follows.